suddenly

(cave) + (brush/fork) + (mouth/small box radical)
★☆☆☆☆
10 strokes
JERKSIDEKICK
In China, this meant Tang Dynasty. The Japanese generally use it to mean 'sudden.' The only hint of its Chinese roots is the Japanese word for 'barbarian.' WTF??? I have no idea if this is also how Chinese use it or if that's just Japan making fun of the Tangs. Anyone out there know?

Onyomi

TOU

Mnemonic

I suddenly tripped on my TOES and fell into the mouth of a cave, landing on an upturned fork. Ouch.

Jukugo

唐突(とうとつ) な or  に

sudden, unexpected ★☆☆☆☆
(suddenly) + (thrust) = 唐突 (sudden, unexpected)

sudden AND unrelated to whatever came before it. Similar to 急に  and 突然, but it emphasizes a random change, emphasizes that there is no cause-and-effect relationship. In other words, 唐突 is not just a sudden guy jumping out from behind a bush or a sudden thunderstorm. 唐突 is more like someone apropos of nothing changing the topic of conversation or getting mad for no apparent reason.

毛唐(けとう)

hairy barbarian! ☆☆☆☆☆ ABUOBSOLETE
(fur) + (suddenly) = 毛唐 (hairy barbarian!)

Lookalikes

Meaning Hint Radical
health WATER
arrest MOVE
suddenly MOUTH

Drink WATER for your health.

The cops MOVE to arrest you.

He said something suddenly with his MOUTH.

Used In

Synonyms

unexpected
突然    唐突